Category guest post

Guest Post: The Psychopathic Author, by A. Jacob Sweeny

I’d like to present a special guest-blog post by author A Jacob Sweeny, entitled: The Psychopathic Author. I hope you enjoy it, and please feel free to click the links to visit the author’s website or pick up her book if you’re interested. Enjoy!

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A Psychopathic Author

I sometimes wonder what people think about me personally after they read the violent scenes I include in my novels. Do they wonder, just like I have so many times, if the author is just a bit psychotic to write down, let alone imagine and come up with such frightening and gruesome details?

Well, I can’t tell you about everyone else, but I can tell you that for me it was rather difficult to convey violence and gore and yet I found it necessary to do so in detail...

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Donna Anastasi Guest Blog: Are Gerbils Lucky?

Michy’s Book Reviews is pleased to invite Donna Anastasi, author of SPIN THE PLATE, to offer a guest blog post on our site. Welcome, Donna, and thank you for your post! Enjoy! Be sure to leave Donna Anastasi a comment!

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There are a couple of phrases that give me a back of the neck prickle and skin crawling annoyance: “play hard” and “serious hobby”. Don’t get me wrong. This country and the people in it would be much better off if adults took the time to play. But once it becomes “hard” or “serious,” you might as well head back into the cubical and get paid for it. I have an obscure hobby that started this time of year 12 years ago...

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Guest Blogger: Author Daniel Dinges

Why I Wrote Get Out of the Way
by Daniel Dinges

Get Out of the Way has to do with the passage of time. At sixty-three, the idea of writing stories about the Vietnam era became more and more attractive to me.

My motivation to write also came from my personal experiences in public high school classrooms several years ago. It is amazing what educators have done to contort the history of the Vietnam War and Sixties culture, with much of its value and relevance relegated to a few dry paragraphs.

The students in these classrooms, however, showed intense interest in what actually went on in the “old days.” We had some great conversations, and giving them primary source insights was a delight. This work attempts to provide an accurate, and close up view of what it was like to be a young adult in the Sixties and early ‘70s.

Perhaps the most important and simplest reason I wrote my first historical novel was to entertain. This story informs, makes you laugh, and perhaps brings you to tears.

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